starting the brain drain PDF Print E-mail
Written by Lutzifer   
Montag, 26 November 2007
ImageAfter a long period of trying to discuss the peculiarities of the gaming world with colleagues in the field of psychology, it dawned on me, that there aren't many gamers in my profession. Scientific research into gaming as a cultural phenomenon is also often somewhat lacking, especially in times when politicians need fast and easy answers to the next school-shooting - usually not involving much reasoning or unbiased thought-processes...
This is topped off by an overabundance of review-sites that seem to mechanically play through games and derive an arbitrary number at the end of their sleepwalking through the experience, lest their sponsors be unhappy.
It's not only the bad stuffings that finally made me create this page, but also the big turkey that is the ever growing gaming-industry, that has given me many years of joy and has filled me with a deep enthusiasm about the psychology of gaming and its underlying systematics of challenge and gratification.



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Last Updated ( Donnerstag, 06 Dezember 2007 )
 
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You know you have to upgrade, when at the same day a program tells you your CPU is to shitty and a new game plainly refuses to start on your pimped-out, watercooled Athlon XP. My system still runs most recent games with decent speeds and with comparably good graphic settings. But it cant hide the fact, that it is still based on an nforce2 chip with an Athlon XP as a CPU. Said CPU lacks SSE2, which seems to be mandatory for certain video-editing programs nowadays (and i should have known since i ran into the same problem at university with the smaller brothers of my CPU and Adobe Premiere [there i said it! Screw you, hidden advertisement schemes]) and may be adverse to performance in any of the latest software offerings on the planet. It's still a fast and rocksolid system, so i ll keep it for music-production in my secondary system, which incidently is an old phillips tube-radio, modded into a pc, so it will be more than fitting there.

Still, it's strange to see an industry force people to switch to newer hardware because they are optimizing their programs to certain computational contraints (e.g. are too lazy to provide backward compatibility). But considering how cheap new hardware is at the moment and how powerful a system needs to be to run the latest games and / or do video-encoding i'm not going to complain. As long as my tax-returns are big enough to ensure a decent upgrade-path, i m a happy camper =)